JUST ME :: and a stack of blank pages

:: Living creatively ::

About me

This is the real secret of life — to be completely engaged with what you are doing in the here and now. And instead of calling it work, realise it is play. The only thing that is ultimately real about your journey is the step that you are taking at this moment. That’s all there ever is. I’m here to tell you that the path to peace is right there, when you want to get away. When you are present, you can allow the mind to be as it is without getting entangled in it. If you miss the present moment, you miss your appointment with life. That is very serious!

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Graptoveria "Fred Ives"

W&N watercolour on Bockingford 300gsm

::
 
A succulent given to me by a friend a couple of months ago growing in a pot in my garden (Tarlton, Gauteng, South Africa)

Category: Succulent
Family: Crassulaceae (Stonecrops)
Origin: Mexico (North America)

x Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’ – A beautiful and durable succulent plant that produces large clumps of rosettes to 8 inches tall by nearly 1 foot wide with broad bronze and pink succulent leaves atop short stems with 1’-2’ long branched inflorescences bearing red-orange centered pale yellow flowers in summer. Plant in full to part sun in a well-drained soil. Little irrigation required.

The leaves are broad and stiff, overlapping each other, with concave upper surface, rubbery to the touch, waxy pearly-bronze to purplish yellow-orange to blue green (depending on time of year and growing conditons). Often shading from grey-blue at the centre out to orange-bronze-purple. The purple blush is fairly consistent throughout the seasons. Higher light and heat seem to increase the purple a bit, though.
This is a vigorous plant and is great as a container specimen or in the ground in well-drained soils or raised planters. It is reportedly a hybrid of Graptopetalum paraguayense crossed with a plant in the Echeveria gibbiflora complex.

2 comments:

  1. I'm enjoying seeing your recent paintings, I wonder if I could grow that one here in France in a pot then it could be outside in summer and brought indoors for the winter ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Barbara, that would be perfect. They grow anywhere in the world in the right soil with enough drainage. So far mine has come indoors every winter, but they tend to become a bit lanky, reaching for light, and maybe I'll consider leaving him outside this winter, just move to another spot that's a bit more protected from the frost. Let me know how it goes with your one.

      Delete

Your comments are welcome! And thank you for visiting my blog!